The feeding habit of sea turtles influences their reaction to artificial marine debris

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Article Info
Brevy ID AID2016062011063801
Author(s) Takuya Fukuoka, Misaki Yamane, Chihiro Kinoshita, Tomoko Narazaki, Greg J. Marshall, Kyler J. Abernathy, Nobuyuki Miyazaki, Katsufumi Sato
Publication Date 2016
Published in Scientific Reports
Domain

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Subdomain Marine ecosystems
DOI 10.1038/srep28015
ISSN 2045-2322
Citations

APA

Takuya Fukuoka, Misaki Yamane, Chihiro Kinoshita, Tomoko Narazaki, Greg J. Marshall, Kyler J. Abernathy, Nobuyuki Miyazaki, Katsufumi Sato (2016) The feeding habit of sea turtles influences their reaction to artificial marine debris. Scientific Reports, 6, 28015.

Chicago

Takuya Fukuoka, Misaki Yamane, Chihiro Kinoshita, Tomoko Narazaki, Greg J. Marshall, Kyler J. Abernathy, Nobuyuki Miyazaki, Katsufumi Sato "The feeding habit of sea turtles influences their reaction to artificial marine debris." Scientific Reports 6 (2016): 28015.

MLA

Takuya Fukuoka, Misaki Yamane, Chihiro Kinoshita, Tomoko Narazaki, Greg J. Marshall, Kyler J. Abernathy, Nobuyuki Miyazaki, Katsufumi Sato "The feeding habit of sea turtles influences their reaction to artificial marine debris." Scientific Reports 6 (2016): 28015.

Topic Tags Chelonia mydas, Caretta caretta, bio-logging
Download Link(s) Unknown

Last edited by Akk during 06/2016.

Quick Summary

Green sea turtles accidentally swallow human-made ocean trash significantly more than loggerhead sea turtles.

Overall Results & Conclusion

The authors found that the feces and digestive system of green sea turtles contained more human-made ocean trash compared to those of loggerhead sea turtles. Both turtles most frequently swallowed garbage that is soft and made of plastic – for example, plastic bags. In addition, they discovered that green sea turtles had a higher chance of coming across ocean trash and accidentally swallowing it compared to loggerhead sea turtles.

Further Information

Expand this section to access further information such as the work's methods, significance, and any critical response.

Methodology

  1. The authors collected the feces of 25 green sea turtles and 28 loggerhead sea turtles between 2012 and 2015 and analyzed the composition of the fece samples.
  2. The authors dissected the corpuses of 10 green sea turtles and 13 loggerhead sea turtles between 2012 and 2015 to find out what was contained in their digestive systems. The collected data were later analyzed statistically.
  3. The authors mounted a video camera on 10 green sea turtles and 15loggerhead sea turtles between September and October of each year from 2007 to 2015 and recorded how the turtles reacted to human-made ocean trash at sea.

Significance

The European Commission lists feces and digestive system analyses as standard methodologies to monitor the effect of ocean litter on marine life. However, the authors suggest that marine life video monitoring can complement conventional methodologies, revealing how marine life behave when they encounter ocean trash - something that cannot be inferred from feces and digestive system analyses.

Article Info
Brevy ID AID2016062011063801
Author(s) Takuya Fukuoka, Misaki Yamane, Chihiro Kinoshita, Tomoko Narazaki, Greg J. Marshall, Kyler J. Abernathy, Nobuyuki Miyazaki, Katsufumi Sato
Publication Date 2016
Published in Scientific Reports
Domain

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Subdomain Marine ecosystems
DOI 10.1038/srep28015
ISSN 2045-2322
Citations

APA

Takuya Fukuoka, Misaki Yamane, Chihiro Kinoshita, Tomoko Narazaki, Greg J. Marshall, Kyler J. Abernathy, Nobuyuki Miyazaki, Katsufumi Sato (2016) The feeding habit of sea turtles influences their reaction to artificial marine debris. Scientific Reports, 6, 28015.

Chicago

Takuya Fukuoka, Misaki Yamane, Chihiro Kinoshita, Tomoko Narazaki, Greg J. Marshall, Kyler J. Abernathy, Nobuyuki Miyazaki, Katsufumi Sato "The feeding habit of sea turtles influences their reaction to artificial marine debris." Scientific Reports 6 (2016): 28015.

MLA

Takuya Fukuoka, Misaki Yamane, Chihiro Kinoshita, Tomoko Narazaki, Greg J. Marshall, Kyler J. Abernathy, Nobuyuki Miyazaki, Katsufumi Sato "The feeding habit of sea turtles influences their reaction to artificial marine debris." Scientific Reports 6 (2016): 28015.

Topic Tags Chelonia mydas, Caretta caretta, bio-logging
Download Link(s) Unknown

Last edited by Akk during 06/2016.

Quick Summary

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.

Overall Results & Conclusion

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.

Further Information

Expand this section to access further information such as the work's methods, significance, and any critical response.

Methodology

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.

Significance

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.