Mercury Reduction and Methyl Mercury Degradation by the Soil Bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2.

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Article Info
Brevy ID AID2016032814365801
Author(s) Amanda K. Petrus, Colin Rutner, Songnian Liu, Yingjiao Wang, Heather A. Wiatrowski
Publication Date 2015
Published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Domain

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Subdomain Soil
DOI 10.1128/aem.01982-15
ISSN 0099-2240
Citations

APA

Amanda K. Petrus, Colin Rutner, Songnian Liu, Yingjiao Wang, Heather A. Wiatrowski (2015) Mercury Reduction and Methyl Mercury Degradation by the Soil Bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2.. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 81(22), 7833-7838.

Chicago

Amanda K. Petrus, Colin Rutner, Songnian Liu, Yingjiao Wang, Heather A. Wiatrowski "Mercury Reduction and Methyl Mercury Degradation by the Soil Bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2.." Applied and Environmental Microbiology 81, no. 22 (2015): 7833-7838.

MLA

Amanda K. Petrus, Colin Rutner, Songnian Liu, Yingjiao Wang, Heather A. Wiatrowski "Mercury Reduction and Methyl Mercury Degradation by the Soil Bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2.." Applied and Environmental Microbiology 81.22 (2015): 7833-7838.

Topic Tags Chemicals, Soil, SFEP
Download Link(s) Unknown

Last edited by Sfep during 03/2016.

Quick Summary

Mercury-resistant bacteria could help scientists to understand more about mercury cycling in the environment.

Overall Results & Conclusion

In a new study, researchers identified one particular strain of soil bacterium that could serve as a model for the conversion of the toxic metal into less toxic forms. The researchers showed that the model species, Py2, is capable of converting both the most toxic form of mercury, MeHg, as well as less toxic Hg(II) ions, into the least toxic form, elemental mercury. They also discovered a new gene involved in the conversion process.

Further Information

Expand this section to access further information such as the work's methods, significance, and any critical response.

Methodology

  1. Py2 cells were grown in bottles and exposed to known quantities of MeHg or Hg(II).
  2. The amounts of MeHg or Hg(II) present after the cells were left to grow for 2 hours was measured.
  3. The researchers also analysed bacterial DNA from the segments of the genome containing the mer genes.

Significance

Bacteria play an important role in the cycling of mercury. Certain bacteria have mer genes, which allow them to convert mercury from one chemical form to another less toxic form. This ability can make the bacteria themselves resistant to the metal and can also be important for influencing the toxicity of mercury entering food chains. Humans and other animals are susceptible to the methylmercury (MeHg) that accumulates in contaminated fish, whilst elemental mercury — mercury (Hg) atoms that are not bound up in compounds — is less toxic and evaporates from water and soil. Mercury ions (Hg(II)) — charged atoms – are more toxic than elemental mercury but less toxic than MeHg.

Article Info
Brevy ID AID2016032814365801
Author(s) Amanda K. Petrus, Colin Rutner, Songnian Liu, Yingjiao Wang, Heather A. Wiatrowski
Publication Date 2015
Published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Domain

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Subdomain Soil
DOI 10.1128/aem.01982-15
ISSN 0099-2240
Citations

APA

Amanda K. Petrus, Colin Rutner, Songnian Liu, Yingjiao Wang, Heather A. Wiatrowski (2015) Mercury Reduction and Methyl Mercury Degradation by the Soil Bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2.. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 81(22), 7833-7838.

Chicago

Amanda K. Petrus, Colin Rutner, Songnian Liu, Yingjiao Wang, Heather A. Wiatrowski "Mercury Reduction and Methyl Mercury Degradation by the Soil Bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2.." Applied and Environmental Microbiology 81, no. 22 (2015): 7833-7838.

MLA

Amanda K. Petrus, Colin Rutner, Songnian Liu, Yingjiao Wang, Heather A. Wiatrowski "Mercury Reduction and Methyl Mercury Degradation by the Soil Bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus Py2.." Applied and Environmental Microbiology 81.22 (2015): 7833-7838.

Topic Tags Chemicals, Soil, SFEP
Download Link(s) Unknown

Last edited by Sfep during 03/2016.

Quick Summary

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.

Overall Results & Conclusion

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.

Further Information

Expand this section to access further information such as the work's methods, significance, and any critical response.

Methodology

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.

Significance

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.