Attention decay in science

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Article Info
Brevy ID AID2016010216352501
Author(s) Pietro Della Parolo, Raj Kumar Pan, Rumi Ghosh, Bernardo A. Huberman, Kimmo Kaski, Santo Fortunato
Publication Date 2015
Published in Journal of Informetrics
Domain

Computer and Systems Science

Subdomain Research
DOI 10.1016/j.joi.2015.07.006
ISSN 1751-1577
Cited By Via Google Scholar
Citations

APA

Pietro Della Parolo, Raj Kumar Pan, Rumi Ghosh, Bernardo A. Huberman, Kimmo Kaski, Santo Fortunato (2015) Attention decay in science. Journal of Informetrics, 9(4), 734-745.

Chicago

Pietro Della Parolo, Raj Kumar Pan, Rumi Ghosh, Bernardo A. Huberman, Kimmo Kaski, Santo Fortunato "Attention decay in science." Journal of Informetrics 9, no. 4 (2015): 734-745.

MLA

Pietro Della Parolo, Raj Kumar Pan, Rumi Ghosh, Bernardo A. Huberman, Kimmo Kaski, Santo Fortunato "Attention decay in science." Journal of Informetrics 9.4 (2015): 734-745.

Topic Tags attention decay, citation count, growth of research, too many articles
Download Link(s) http://arxiv.org/pdf/1503.0188...

Last edited by Brevyorg during 02/2016.

Quick Summary

An analysis of scholarly paper citation counts over time concludes that papers are forgotten more quickly amidst the high number published

Overall Results & Conclusion

Analysis of average paper citation rates over time implies that, while time until peak attention (citation rate) has decreased in current years, the rate of decay of paper attention has markedly increased. This decay can be generalized as an exponential decay function across various disciplines. Finally, this decay rate correlates well with the high number of published papers in each field rather than time itself.

Further Information

Expand this section to access further information such as the work's methods, significance, and any critical response.

Methodology

  1. All papers in English written through 2010 in the Thomson Reuters Web of Science were pooled
    1. These papers were broken into disciplines using information on Thomson Reuters
    2. The papers were culled to the top 10% by citation count for use in most later analyses
  2. Average paper citation count was plotted against time since publication in each discipline. From this, various analyses were performed:
    1. Time until peak attention (citation count) and the general life cycle of papers are reviewed
    2. Decay in attention after the peak is mathematically modeled
  3. Decay in attention is compared across both time and number of publications in that discpline

Significance

If research papers are losing attention more quickly due to the high number of papers published in each field, it can be argued that papers will be forgotten more quickly in the future as the number of published papers continues to increase. This implies that the general value of a published scholarly work may, in some sense, decrease, and that otherwise important works may go unnoticed. If true, the need for different tools or methods of publishing and distributing scholarly research may be warranted for consideration.

Article Info
Brevy ID AID2016010216352501
Author(s) Pietro Della Parolo, Raj Kumar Pan, Rumi Ghosh, Bernardo A. Huberman, Kimmo Kaski, Santo Fortunato
Publication Date 2015
Published in Journal of Informetrics
Domain

Computer and Systems Science

Subdomain Research
DOI 10.1016/j.joi.2015.07.006
ISSN 1751-1577
Cited By Via Google Scholar
Citations

APA

Pietro Della Parolo, Raj Kumar Pan, Rumi Ghosh, Bernardo A. Huberman, Kimmo Kaski, Santo Fortunato (2015) Attention decay in science. Journal of Informetrics, 9(4), 734-745.

Chicago

Pietro Della Parolo, Raj Kumar Pan, Rumi Ghosh, Bernardo A. Huberman, Kimmo Kaski, Santo Fortunato "Attention decay in science." Journal of Informetrics 9, no. 4 (2015): 734-745.

MLA

Pietro Della Parolo, Raj Kumar Pan, Rumi Ghosh, Bernardo A. Huberman, Kimmo Kaski, Santo Fortunato "Attention decay in science." Journal of Informetrics 9.4 (2015): 734-745.

Topic Tags attention decay, citation count, growth of research, too many articles
Download Link(s) http://arxiv.org/pdf/1503.0188...

Last edited by Brevyorg during 02/2016.

Quick Summary

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.

Overall Results & Conclusion

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.

Further Information

Expand this section to access further information such as the work's methods, significance, and any critical response.

Methodology

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.

Significance

This section data hasn't yet been added. Please edit this page to provide the information.